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Low calorie diet may improve cell performance

Publicado em 13 fevereiro 2019

The protection of a low calorie diet against some of the diseases may have a protective effect because the number of calories that people may have; eating their direct impact on performing different cells, says researchers.
The mice examined that the low calorie diet of the brain could be protected from the death of neuronal cells linked to diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy and cerebral spongic disaster (CVA).
"We look at how dietary changes affect metabolism and how to reduce the risk of disease to be associated with & # 39; getting older, "said co-author Alicia Kowaltowski, Professor of Sao Paulo University in Brazil.
For the inspection, presented at the London FAPESP Week, which will take place on 11-13 February, divide the marsh search team into two groups.
They counted the average number of non-consuming calories. group without caloric restriction and then they would provide food for the other organizations 40 per cent fewer calories.
After 14 weeks, mice belonging to the two groups introduced intojection to arthritis that caused aggression, destruction and death of neuronal cells.
The researchers got even though the ones in the group did not have a & # 39; restrict their food to & # 39; attacked, those who were not restricted.
–IANS

The protection of a low calorie diet against some of the diseases may have a protective effect because the number of calories that people may have; eating their direct impact on performing different cells, says researchers.

The mice examined that the low calorie diet of the brain could be protected from the death of neuronal cells linked to diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, epilepsy and cerebral spongic disaster (CVA).

"We look at how dietary changes affect metabolism and how to reduce the risk of disease to be associated with & # 39; getting older, "said co-author Alicia Kowaltowski, Professor of Sao Paulo University in Brazil.

For the inspection, presented at the London FAPESP Week, which will take place on 11-13 February, divide the marsh search team into two groups.

They counted the average number of non-consuming calories. group without caloric restriction and then they would provide food for the other organizations 40 per cent fewer calories.

After 14 weeks, mice belonging to the two groups introduced intojection to arthritis that caused aggression, destruction and death of neuronal cells.

The researchers got even though the ones in the group did not have a & # 39; restrict their food to & # 39; attacked, those who were not restricted.

–IANS