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Health Thoroughfare (Canadá)

Deforestation Will Increase Global Warming More Than Expected, A New Study Reveals

Publicado em 07 março 2018

The vast deforestation of tropical regions is negatively impacting on Earth’s climate and that has been proven by various studies. However, a new study reveals that massive deforestation will increase global warming more than expected since the affected areas emit more carbon dioxide.

Thus, the tropical areas lose their historical role of fresh air suppliers for our planet and Earth’s natural protection against climate change.

The study reveals that destroying forests will irreversibly increase global warming

The science team has drawn these gloomy conclusions after applying a computer mathematical model of the Earth’s atmosphere at it is right now, created by the UK meteorological institution, Met Office.

The researchers included different factors in the computer modeling, including ozone levels, aerosols, methane emissions, carbon dioxide emissions, meteorological factors of influence, and biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC).

“If we go on destroying forests at the current pace – some 7,000 sq km per year in the case of Amazonia – in three to four decades, we’ll have a massive accumulated loss. This will intensify global warming regardless of all efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions,” according to Paulo Artaxo, one of the study’s authors and a professor at the University of São Paulo.

Deforestation alters the Earth atmosphere’s natural radiations equilibrium

According to the report, the deforestation is changing the quantity of ozone and aerosols in the Earth’s atmosphere, which, eventually, leads to a massive alteration of the atmosphere’s natural radiations equilibrium.

“The urgent need to keep the world’s forests standing is even clearer in light of this study. It’s urgent not only to stop their destruction but also to develop large-scale reforestation policies, especially for tropical regions. Otherwise, the effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels won’t make much difference,” explained Professor Paulo Artaxo from the University of São Paulo.

The new research on deforestation impact on global warming was issued in the journal Nature Communications.