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Colored filter improves dyslexic children's reading speed

Publicado em 18 outubro 2018

A study described in an article by Brazilian and French researchers reports increased reading speed for nine- and ten-year-old volunteers with dyslexia who used green filters. The filters had no effect on age-matched children without dyslexia.
Colored filters for the treatment of learning disabilities were first patented in 1983. They were also designed for use by children with autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).
Studies - Efficacy - Methodology - Time - Milena
"However, studies of their efficacy were methodologically flawed. We used a highly rigorous methodology for the first time," said Milena Razuk, first author of the article, published in the journal Research in Developmental Disabilities.
The filters are not widely used in Brazil owing to a lack of research, although they have been adopted in some countries, such as France.
Razuk - PhD - April - Cruzeiro - Sul
Razuk, who completed her PhD in April at Cruzeiro do Sul University (São Paulo, Brazil), performed the experiment while in France on a research internship at Paris Diderot University (Paris 7), with support from the Sao Paulo Research Foundation -- FAPESP.
Eighteen children with dyslexia and 18 without dyslexia were selected for the study at Robert Debré Hospital in Paris. The researchers decided to use yellow and green filters in the experiment.
Twelve - Colors - Test - Volunteers - José
"Twelve colors are available, but we chose two because a very long test would be too demanding for the volunteers," said José Angelo Barela, a professor at São Paulo State University's Rio Claro Bioscience Institute (IBRC-UNESP) in Brazil and principal investigator for the project.
All 36 children were asked to read passages from children's books suited to their reading age. The texts were displayed on a computer screen with a yellow filter, a green filter, and no filter.
Eye - Movements - Mobile - EyeBrain - Tracker®
Their eye movements were recorded with the Mobile EyeBrain Tracker®, a French eye-tracking device certified for medical purposes, consisting of goggles fitted with cameras that record the movements of each eye independently via infrared...

A study described in an article by Brazilian and French researchers reports increased reading speed for nine- and ten-year-old volunteers with dyslexia who used green filters. The filters had no effect on age-matched children without dyslexia.

Colored filters for the treatment of learning disabilities were first patented in 1983. They were also designed for use by children with autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

Studies - Efficacy - Methodology - Time - Milena

"However, studies of their efficacy were methodologically flawed. We used a highly rigorous methodology for the first time," said Milena Razuk, first author of the article, published in the journal Research in Developmental Disabilities.

The filters are not widely used in Brazil owing to a lack of research, although they have been adopted in some countries, such as France.

Razuk - PhD - April - Cruzeiro - Sul

Razuk, who completed her PhD in April at Cruzeiro do Sul University (São Paulo, Brazil), performed the experiment while in France on a research internship at Paris Diderot University (Paris 7), with support from the Sao Paulo Research Foundation - FAPESP.

Eighteen children with dyslexia and 18 without dyslexia were selected for the study at Robert Debré Hospital in Paris. The researchers decided to use yellow and green filters in the experiment.

Twelve - Colors - Test - Volunteers - José

"Twelve colors are available, but we chose two because a very long test would be too demanding for the volunteers," said José Angelo Barela, a professor at São Paulo State University's Rio Claro Bioscience Institute (IBRC-UNESP) in Brazil and principal investigator for the project.

All 36 children were asked to read passages from children's books suited to their reading age. The texts were displayed on a computer screen with a yellow filter, a green filter, and no filter.

Eye - Movements - Mobile - EyeBrain - Tracker®

Their eye movements were recorded with the Mobile EyeBrain Tracker®, a French eye-tracking device certified for medical purposes, consisting of goggles fitted with cameras that record the movements of each eye independently via infrared...

(Excerpt) Read more at: ScienceDaily